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Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Chocolate is my poison.

I have long been a fan of chocolate - really for as long as I can remember. I mean there are few and far between folks who say to me, "I don't like chocolate." And I will be honest and admit that when someone says this to me they are immediately suspect in my mind. How can you homeschool and not like chocolate. Nay - not like, but truly need chocolate on those desperate days that come now and then. This is my poison tonight...


 



 


Lest you think I like it light and airy -  I don't. I like it dark and bittersweet with all the sharp biting sweet chocolately-melting-in-your-mouth you can find. And all the wax removed. I am a purist. I thank God for the Aztecs - for without them a homeschool mother's life might be very different.


 


You homeschool dads, or future homeschool dads, take note! You will be your wife's best friend if you consider her chocolate needs and meet them.

Monday, January 30, 2006

Theology Realm Extended

I love a good discussion and for many a long month I have enjoyed Pyromaniac's writing. Well, things have gotten a little spicier in the blog world (that is what adding a bit of garlic and cayenne will do to you) and we now have not one, but multiples of Pyromaniacs to dispel the world's theological myths and legends. (Or at least to give it a good go!)


 


So if you are looking for a rousing discussion of almost anything theology related (or even just some fantastic banter) you will want to head on over. I intend to make it a regular stop.


 


Kate


 

Thursday, January 26, 2006

Fantasy ~ Magic ~ Fairytales

A question was posed on the same board I read - it seems to be full of thoughtful things for me recently - and here it is:


 


Magic, Fairytales, Fantasy in Literature- Looking for some Answers! Please help!,

Hi,
I am currently taking Literature for Children, a 300 level class. I admit I am one of those that is cautious and wary of this type of literature for religious reasons. Please can someone explain, enlighten me as to why and how exactly this is still beneficial and important? Does it really challenge our values to an extent that we actually become stronger? Even children?
I am quite lost! Please advise. Thankyou


 


 


Here was my answer:


 


I am not sure what a 300 level class is, but I will give you my thoughts on literature for children. You wrote: "Does it really challenge our values to an extent that we actually become stronger? Even children?"


 


We are a Christian family who reads all sorts of literature at what we feel are the appropriate ages. This really is a family to family decision that cannot be decided by group discussion. One family here will thing Harry Potter is a bad choice and other families will think it is just fine. You have to decide for yourself.


 


I think the better question is to ask yourself would be, why NOT read the literature and what literature are you referring to specifically? Not all fantasy, fairytales, and magic stories are the same by any means. We really enjoy this type of literature, but we view it through our Christian worldview lenses. We can still enjoy it for its story quality though.


 


My 11 and almost 9 yods can spot differing worldviews in a story because they know their own - that is really the key to me. The world if full of different viewpoints, ideas, and stories. In my personal view it narrows their lives if we prevent children from experiencing some of them. It also may limit their ability to understand their own culture and those around them. Does this mean you have to let them read any and everything? By no means! That is what good parental filtering is for. I am careful what I give them, but I do not completely limit any one kind of story.


 


I think of the Chronicles of Narnia for example - yes there is magic there, and even a white witch, but there are also some very good moral examples of self-sacrifice, realization of one's inner sinful choices, and repentance. What is the ultimate message of any book that we give our children? I hope to convey truths through the stories we read. In my worldview, all truth is ultimately God's truth so what truths we read about support our faith. Just because it is in fantasy form or have magic elements in it does not make it a poor choice.


 


Does it make my children stronger? I think so. They can sort through what is truth and what is false with a greater ease because they are exposed to it in the safety of our home with the help of a mother who can help them discern. It has also fostered amazing conversations that would not have happened otherwise. Read aloud time is a good place to start this.







So what would you have said?

Friday, January 20, 2006

More on that...

Thanks Donna, Spunky, and Elaine, and anyone else who chooses to weigh in on this.


 


I was not asking the question below so that I could get out of anything or because I think I can choose what to submit to and what not to.


 


I think I am looking for something that explains what God's word means when it says "submission" and what it means to you because there are a whole lot of different views on the subject out there.


 


I suppose I didn't phrase my question correctly - I really would like to know how it works in your home when you and your husband do not agree at all on something huge and potentially life-changing for your children. How much of your thoughts/wishes/desires come into play when you are really at odds with your husband?


 


I am not at odds with my own, but reading what I did recently brought up all sorts of thoughts for me. My own home is not difficult to live in. But what if I had a husband who did not regard my thoughts about anything? How then are we to live as women? Are we to have no say in things that affect our lives? Does Biblical submission mean that we just do what he says even when it is clearly foolish or even wrong for our families? Thank God I have a good and solid husband and I am not faced with these choices, but I have had friends who have been. How am I to counsel them correctly if I don't know what God's word clearly says?


 


Obviously, I am not only going to the blogosphere for this answer, but I want to understand what my sisters in Christ think about this. There have been a whole host of answers to the questions posed on the board I read and I don't see any Greek exegesis for the word anywhere. Even in my search I am finding it hard to find good answers.


 


I guess I don't think the Bible talks about submission being something that is done on its own - separate for its own sake. I don't know that I think the Bible speaks about the women submitting for anything and everything because if you look at Proverbs 31 - she is not at all the doormat that I see some people advocating for women within the church in some places. How can the definition be so different for so many people? And what about submitting to one another in love and the husband loving the wife as Christ loves the church? Where does submission fit into that and what is the wife's role in all of it?


 


I am asking these questions because I think they are important to think about as women for ourselves and for our friends and daughters. What if my daughter married a horrible man who was nothing like a Biblical man should be? God, please forbid that that should happen! What if it does though? What do I counsel her? Just submit to everything he asks and it will all be OK? Is that really what God's word says?


 


It is easy for me to say that when I have a loving and godly husband - because I do. What about those women who don't? What does God's word really say to them? What does it say to us?


 


That is at the heart of it for me and I would love your thoughts or links on the net to some solid information. I love my dear husband and wish to be the kind of wife that he finds joy in - we have a loving and precious relationship and I am not looking to usurp him in any way. I just want some answers to questions that seem to be difficult for many.


 


Warmly,


Kate


 

Thursday, January 19, 2006

Submission and Homeschooling - Hmmm?

I am posting this in light of a conversation on a board I read. I am curious how your homeschool was born and what would happen if your husband up and said, "We are putting them in public school." or "We are putting them in private school." How would you respond?


 


I look forward to reading your responses.


Kate


 

Monday, January 16, 2006

Free Monday!

I recently subscribed to The Old Schoolhouse Magazine's, Homeschooling for Free e-Newsletter. I was not sure what to expect, but was curious enough to check it out. There is a lot more information in it than I expected, and I am picky and hard to please. (I admit it, OK?!) :+) I thought it might be something some of you are interested in. You can subscribe to one of many or to all of their free e-newsletters here. They are also running a Draw Write Now book contest and you can find that here.


 


Also, for those of you who really like contests with free curriculum, you can check out this page and have at it! There is even a writing contest for those of you who like to write (and if you are blogging, I imagine you like to write!)


 


Enjoy!


Kate


 


 


 

Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Pat Robertson does not represent me!

I recently read the story where Pat Robertson spoke for God about the stroke that Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon recently had. He had the audacity to say,


 


He also said, however, that in the Bible, the prophet Joel "makes it very clear that God has enmity against those who 'divide my land."'



Sharon "was dividing God's land and I would say woe unto any prime minister of Israel who takes a similar course to appease the EU (European Union), the United Nations, or the United States of America," Robertson said. 


 


Now perhaps there are readers of mine that believe what Pat Robertson said to be true. I know that many Christians think that Israel still plays an important role to Christians today and in end times prophecy.  I know that many believe exactly what Pat Robertson's spokesperson says below:


 


Robertson spokeswoman Angell Watts said of critics who challenged his remarks, "What they're basically saying is, `How dare Pat Robertson quote the Bible?"'


 


"This is what the word of God says," Watts said. "This is nothing new to the Christian community."


 


I would beg to differ with her. I do not believe that Pat Robertson knows what goes on in the heart and mind of God let alone that he has interpreted God's word correctly here. I find it appalling that he would publicly call Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's stroke a judgment of God. How can Pat Robertson possibly know that? I also find it appalling that people in the world think that Pat Robertson speaks for all Christians! He does not speak for me, and actually I think he does a great deal of damage to Christians.


 


When I was a new Christian I struggled with passages in scripture that talked about Christ's coming, and I struggled with the role Israel was said to play in God's plan. I was not satisfied with the answers my Dispensational church was giving me to scriptures like this:


 


Matthew 16:27-28 (New American Standard Bible)


"For the Son of Man is going to come in the glory of His Father with His angels, and will then repay every man according to his deeds. Truly I say to you, there are some of those who are standing here who will not taste death until they see the Son of Man coming in His kingdom."


 


What did it mean - "those who are standing here who will not taste death" - how can that be explained in the future sense when it so clearly speaks of something soon without compromising God's word? Well it CAN be explained and I was thrilled to find out that the Bible was living and accurate and made sense. God did not leave us without the truth, but those to whom I was turning for theological clarity had a different worldview and saw the Bible through a Dispensational lense.


 


There is another lense and I found the help I needed in some of the books below. I read with fascination as RC Sproul explained things to me in a whole new way. I cannot recommend his book highly enough. Gary DeMar also dives deeply into God's word and explains passages like these and much more. God is still our holy God, Jesus is still His majestic and perfect son - our sacrifice, nothing is compromised of what is true, but scripture makes SENSE now! 


 


The Last Days According to Jesus, R.C. Sproul


and


Last Days Madness, Gary DeMar


and a book recommended by both Mr. DeMar and Mr. Sproul,


The Parousia, by J. Stuart Russell


 


I plan on getting The Parousia soon and I can't wait!


 


Kate

Friday, January 06, 2006

They found me in the library!

This story is SO strange it is hard to imagine it being legitimate, but it is! So which book would you choose to be bound in? Something to think about...







Some of nation’s best libraries have books bound in human skin


 


PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- Brown University’s library boasts an unusual anatomy book. Tanned and polished to a smooth golden brown, its cover looks and feels no different from any other fine leather.


 


But here’s its secret: the book is bound in human skin.


 


A number of prestigious libraries—including Harvard University’s—have such books in their collections. While the idea of making leather from human skin seems bizarre and cruel today, it was not uncommon in centuries past, said Laura Hartman, a rare book cataloger at the National Library of Medicine in Maryland and author of a paper on the subject.


 


An article from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from the late 1800s “suggests that it was common, but it also indicates it wasn’t talked about in polite society,” Hartman said.


 


The best libraries then belonged to private collectors. Some were doctors who had access to skin from amputated parts and patients whose bodies were not claimed. They found human leather to be relatively cheap, durable and waterproof, Hartman said.


 


In other cases, wealthy bibliophiles may have acquired the skin from criminals who were executed, cadavers used in medical schools and people who died in the poor house, said Sam Streit, director of Brown’s John Hay Library.


(Here is the rest of the story that really must be read as it is TOO odd!!)

Good for him!

Navy surrenders: Chaplain eating
Hunger strike comes to end with OK to pray in uniform in name of Jesus


© 2006 WorldNetDaily.com


 


The Navy chaplain who has gone without food for 18 days in protest of the Navy's policy encouraging "inclusive" prayers at public events says he has received permission to wear his uniform and pray in Jesus' name outside the White House tomorrow and will end his hunger strike by taking communion there.


 


Lt. Gordon James Klingenschmitt had said he would not eat until President Bush signed an executive order allowing chaplains to pray in public according to their individual faith traditions. Later, he said if the Navy would allow him to wear his uniform in public and pray in Jesus' name he would end his fast. Klingenschmitt told WND this evening he has received a letter from his commanding officer giving him permission to do so.
(Rest of the story...)






May God raise up more men to stand for Jesus; to say enough is enough, I will not pray to nothing!

Thursday, January 05, 2006

Now and then

I will be popping in now and again to post something that is on my mind, but I will probably not blog on a regular basis. If you find that suits you then welcome! I look forward to "seeing" you on my blog whenever the mood hits you.


 


I thought I would post this really wonderful recipe because Sparrow made me think of it and I just ate it again this past weekend. Talk about immune-boosting!


 


Here you go...


 


Chicken Pasole


 


3 large onions, chopped


12 cloves garlic, chopped


11/2 Table. oregano


1 teasp. ground cumin


3 Table. olive oil


1 cut up uncooked broiler/fryer chicken with skin removed


9 cups chicken broth (or two large cans)


3 4 oz cans diced green chilis


44 oz. can hominy


11/2 can sliced ripe olives


 


Stir onions, garlic, oregano, cumin, and olive oil about five minutes until onion is limp. Add chicken, broth, chilis, hominy to pan and then cover and bring to boil. Simmer 20 minutes then remove from heat. Cover and let stand for about 30 minutes. Lift chicken from liquid and break in bite-sized pieces. Throw out bones. Add olives and bring to boil over high heat.


 


This goes great with cornbread!


 


Enjoy!


Kate