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Saturday, October 22, 2005

American Girl Controversy - What's your take?

Groups Threaten to Boycott American Girl



By DAVID CRARY, AP National Writer
Fri Oct 14, 7:39 PM ET
 
NEW YORK - American Girl, manufacturer of a highly popular line of dolls and children's books, has become the target of conservative activists threatening a boycott unless the toy maker cuts off contributions to a youth organization that supports abortion rights and acceptance of lesbians.
 
The protest is directed at an ongoing American Girl campaign in which proceeds from sales of a special "I Can" wristband help support educational and empowerment programs of Girls Inc., a national nonprofit organization which describes its mission as "inspiring girls to be strong, smart and bold."


 


The rest of the article here.


 


So what is your take on this? I would really like to know.


 


Warmly,


Kate


 


 


 


 

8 comments:

sparrow said...

Does American Girl claim to be a Christian company?


If not, then I don't see the point in boycotting. I'm sure most of the corporations I do business with (everything from Brawny paper towels to Amazon.com to my mortgage company) have connections or associations that are not entirely Christian. In order to be consistent in this area we'd be pretty limited in our choices. One friend of mine won't shop at Old Navy because their clothes are produced by child labor in third world countries; another doesn't shop at Cost Plus World Market because their furniture is made from rainforest wood. I think those are compelling reasons to not shop somewhere, but I struggle to know where to draw the line. It's a pretty small world in terms of who is connected to whom.


That said, if you know something about a corporation and you don't want your money to support them any longer, more power to you!

MiddleEarthMom said...

I agree that it is impossible to boycott everything that has a connection to evil. We live after all, in a wicked world. I don't really respond to every boycott request that heads my way.


That said, I do think we should SUPPORT better companies when we get the chance. Vision Forum has similar dolls for about the same price and what they claim is better quality. When I get ready to purchase one (probably in a year or two) I will choose Vision Forum over this organization because I want to SUPPORT good causes.


This does not mean I blindly conform to every opinion of Vision Forum. I don't. (don't even get me started!) But overall, their aims and goals are MUCH closer to my own and they deserve support in this instance.


Mia

Anonymous said...

Wow, now I have another excuse for not buying my daughters an overpriced trendy little doll. Just kidding. sortof.

How sad but it does seem the way of the world to be confused about how best to help people.

Jennifer

esperanzavallero said...

Wow, now I have another excuse for not buying my daughters an overpriced trendy little doll. Just kidding. sortof.

How sad but it does seem the way of the world to be confused about how best to help people.

Jennifer

esperanzavallero said...

Sorry for the duplicate message, I just really wanted to give you the link to my blog so we can be friends.

Love

Jen

CAgirlwithasoutherndrawl said...

There are probably quite a few ways to approach this issue. All of them come from a bias as illustrated from the above poster. "...a good excuse not to buy my daughter a expensive, trendy doll..." I think a lot of people that will participate in this "boycott" will be in this catagory. They never really intended to buy the doll and now they have a good reason not to, in their opinion. This (politically speaking) is a pointless way to bring about any sort of change, for obvious reason.


The next bias is one that I am familiar with in this case. My mother bought Bitty Baby for my daughter last Christmas. She did this from 2,000 miles away knowing that she could continue to build into this collection year after year. For me this "revelation" that the company supports L & PP is annoying. There are very few established companies that are not in some way affiliated with these groups. I am of the opinion that if I don't stand with a group that boycotts together and signifacantly affects their profits it is seriously piontless. Let's say for example, the Southern Baptist Boycott of Disney....pointless. So few actually ceased from purchasing/ attending/ supporting Disney that it was laughable. This is not a way to bring about political change. argghh! I feel at a lose to completely articulate how absurd I think this issue is.


Bottom line...I am not going to tell my Mom to stop getting American Girl products and I am not going to hide the doll when my hs friends come over with their kids.


~Annemarie

CAgirlwithasoutherndrawl said...

Came back to say that I did not read the article link because it had expired. I was posting purely on my knowlegde of the websites I had visited. I am totally ignorant of the groups that are attempting to organize a boycott.


~Annemarie

Anonymous said...

Our family are fans of American Girl, despite our usual avoidance of such heavily marketed brands. The values in the books are good. Their support of the girls' organizations is entirely appropriate. The radical right has blown that way out of all proportion. Even if one is opposed to reproductive freedom, I don't see the connection between the programs supported by American Girl and the issue of abortion.


What concerns me much more, and makes me a reluctant customer, is the fact that even though some of the stories promote strong social values, the dolls themselves are made mainly in China, and it is difficult to find any information on how well the human rights of factory workers there are being monitored.